Australia

1960s students with stars in the aisle

Mosman’s Warren Mitchell is another person who is familiar with the practice of dark arts. “High school metalworking class, 1960s. The ceiling was a constellation of star knives. Occasionally, people underneath were at risk,” added Andrew Richmund of Castle Hill. I am. “The inside of the roof of the Castle Hill High meetinghouse was adorned with star knives secretly made during metalworking for several years. It’s worth stopping if caught.”

“How much prospect samurai Worshiped by children in the 1960s samurai The card (C8) was never fixed to the bicycle frame to make a clicking sound as the wheels rotate. This was usually reserved for the footcards of the teams I hate, “says Peter Mini Utti of Ashbury.

“I have a Qantas Freakant Flyer account,” writes David Arnett of Leura. “Qantas says I’m one of the many seniors chosen to represent Qantas clients aged 79-85. Clients say what my honest opinion about goodness is I want to know what I know. I don’t go anywhere so I wondered why. I also get QF points for each survey I complete. I include the year of birth in 1941. I filled out all the fields on the online registration form, created a password that is often forgotten and pressed submit. My efforts were rejected. I forgot to tell my client that I am over 18 years old Was. “

Regarding the reuse of soft plastic (C8), Avalon’s Kathy Tufts said, “Used by Charity Network Heaven. Herald Wrap as a bag to send over 100 parcels to underprivileged children in Sri Lanka on Christmas 2020. Most years we send over 3000 packages including clothing, toiletries, school supplies and toys, but unfortunately we couldn’t send this year due to COVID-19 restrictions. Achieve our goals. But we saved the bag from the landfill and didn’t have to buy a zip lock. Thank you, SMH!! “

Alan Roberts of Marrickville proposes a two-step approach. Walk to your local newspaper store. 2. Buy paper from a real person. Exercise, support local small businesses, and reduce plastic. “

“Yesterday I saw a mysterious sight,” says Tim Waldock of Bronte. “The drone jumped over my backyard at a considerable speed. I quickly found out why-the magpie was being enthusiastically tracked. One minute later, the drone flew back and moved even faster. Then, screaming with joy from below, the magpie repeatedly plummeted. “

Column8@smh.com.au

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1960s students with stars in the aisle

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