Australia

Are two heads better than one in a matter of state?

We couldn’t agree more that class inequality in housing is one of the most pressing issues for Australians and the rest of the world. Both Labor and Liberals have ignored the issue since the late 1980s. At the time, I saw various associates (who rubbed off on the lower middle class) buying not just one or two properties, but eight to ten properties each. been ignored for some time. No political party has the guts to enforce the one residential per adult and one commercial per adult rule. It may sound like something called socialism (it’s not), but we might rename it ‘sharing’. It’s not about abolishing private property, it’s about limiting extreme ownership. If more properties were put up for sale, far more of the permanently staying-to-rent groups would be able to afford housing. reform will also help. To stand up for the parks and mental health and environmental comfort, dumping in the Inner West is hardly the answer. Karang Park has a lot of plans and for locals to maintain for their medical staff. There’s already affordable housing battling to. The western part of the state has the second lowest percentage of green space per capita in the state. Anne-Therese King, Lilyfield

Callan Parkcredit:oscar coleman

In light of current inequalities in housing, services, education, wealth and Indigenous disadvantage, it may be time to look back at the past when the country was called ‘Commonwealth of Australia’. This title should be the name and aspiration of this nation. Common wealth, not the haves and have-nots. Our political class and business leaders have lost sight of the fact that if we are a federation, we all have stakes and desires for all improvement while pursuing our own desires. Once upon a time, all currency and government letterhead reinforced the notion of federalism. When did we become the apathetic Australia we are today? Alex Maynard, Round Corner

Local action on the world stage

It is refreshing to see the Prime Minister admitting that ‘aid’ is among the ‘factors of power that need to be increased’ (World’s Warming to Australia, 24 September). He currently ranks 22nd among OECD foreign aid donors. In contrast, a report released last week showed Australians as the richest people in the world. Clay O’Brien, Mosman

Foreign Minister Penny Wong.

Foreign Minister Penny Wong.credit:Alex Ellinghausen

Penny Wong has a great foreign minister and the prime minister turns out to be a true diplomat. Establishing our status as responsible global citizens on climate change is critical. If he’s already repositioning Australia in the world, it’s Anthony Albanese for real, truly ready to get involved, showing a firm stance but keeping his formality down. His vision of is only reinforced by this broader perspective. Margaret Johnston, Paddington

Anthony Albanese on the world stage boasts an Australian climate credential, reminiscent of the children’s story The Emperor’s New Clothes. Although some progress has been made with the passage of new climate legislation, the prime minister should not be too proud of himself. The government remains business as usual with coal and gas exports, which account for millions of tons of global emissions annually. Hopefully, this folly will be exposed at a future international forum. Ann O’Hara, Waniassa (ACT)

teacher’s lesson

The purported lucrativeness of permanent teaching jobs says a lot about what is wrong with teaching in NSW.Record Number of Teachers Leaving”, September 24). In the past, students obtained teaching qualifications, applied to departments, were interviewed, and if they passed, were appointed to the school. You are special when you receive a permanent appointment. The best jobs most graduates can look forward to are casual jobs or temporary contracts. A full-time job should not be considered profitable. It should be the bare minimum provided. Bill Gillis, Hallidays Point

The elephant in the room about teacher complaints and teacher loss is student behavior and the reluctance of principals to do something about it. The number of angels I have taught for twenty-three years will be hosts in Heaven. Along with the English/History teacher’s load of grading, preparing, and teaching, it exhausted me. I was so happy when I quit, and I haven’t seen an essay in over 20 years. Genevieve Milton, Newtown

Ask a question now

It is now even more important to disseminate the ethics of primary education to all schoolchildren (“TikTok tricks teens with fake news24 Sept.) armed vulnerable young people with the inquiring minds, critical thinking, and ethical reasoning necessary to cut through the misinformation reaching their minds. I think the mind will benefit. Helen Lewin, Tambi Ambi

spare royal expense

Welsh Prince and Princess

Welsh Prince and Princesscredit:Getty Images

Many monarchists and others would welcome the visit of the Prince and Princess of Wales next year (letterBut our budget deficit is staggering and we can’t afford the huge associated costs. It’s time to stop putting unnecessary things on your national credit card. Stephanie Edwards, Roseville

Axle stupidity

I don’t think people deliberately board floods (letter, September 24). The problem is that most people don’t know what “flood” means. A few years ago, one of his local colleges demonstrated that a vehicle becomes a boat when the water reaches the height of the axle. Perhaps the message should be “Don’t drive in water at axle height”. Roger Campbell, Beecroft

gong show

I am personally concerned that “selling Wollongong to the world” will be taken literally by the NSW government (“A course with everything that captivated cycling’s big fish”, September 24). We enjoy sharing the beauty of our area, but if you give the NSW government an idea to privatize, they will do it. Janice Cleanone, Austin Mar

better stay

Au contraire, Richard Glover (“Shower glitch and hotel chaos”, September 24). Airbnb has changed the way we travel forever. Without exception, my experience was a positive one. I am writing from my luxurious apartment in Stockholm. Sure, getting to bed takes some athleticism, but when you’re exhausted after a long day of sightseeing and forget to “do,” a stuffy concierge or an unwelcome “room service” wake-up call is There is none. Do not disturb sign. Oh, and the luxury of being able to open a window cannot be underestimated. Janet Argal, Dulwich Hill

Reading Richard Glover’s lodging experience reminded me that when it comes to travel, there’s no better place than home. Alan Gibson, Cherrybrook

true powerhouse

I was standing at the Powerhouse Museum (letter, Sept 24) Once I was watching a demo of the Bolton and Watt engines, an English gentleman said to me: he got very angry. Marsha Horvey, Pennant Hills

swan song

A small victory I know, but I watched it to the bitter end. The myth of sunny Swans supporters has now been broken. you’re welcome. Ian McNeil, Ainsley (ACT)

All Blacks haka

All Blacks hakacredit:Getty

Why are the New Zealand All Blacks allowed to dance the haka before international rugby matches? Peng Ee, Castle Cove

deprived of energy

Last week, I spent about an hour online putting together a new energy contract. There are dozens of suppliers offering dozens of options, all lasting 12 months. The thought of doing it all over again in 12 months is daunting. Barbara Ryan, Kalimbah South

save date

63 years ago my husband proposed on Anzac Day to remember that day (letter, September 24). done. Marie Grady, French’s Forest

save doggy

Darko “Dougie” Desic (letter, 24 September) has been ‘jailed’ in Sydney for almost 30 years as a fugitive without breaking any other law. I believe he is fine and he has really redeemed himself. North Ryde, Sue Casilia

digital view
Online comments from one of the stories that garnered the most reader feedback yesterday smh.com.au
A third of Australians oppose higher immigration limits
from Sunseeker 71: Increase immigration to areas where there is a lack of skills or simply a shortage of jobs, such as nurses, truck drivers, fruit pickers and service workers, which most Australians are reluctant to do. Many economic migrants want to drive trucks to put food on their family tables.

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Are two heads better than one in a matter of state?

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