Australia

Charities pay for liberal fundraising, despite no-hitter for regulatory donations

Charities are not intended for political contributions, but the Liberal Party receives tens of thousands of dollars from registered charities.

Armenian Relief Society donated to the Liberal Party (Image: Provided)

The Liberal Party has raised tens of thousands of dollars from registered charities. This is despite the fact that charities are not supposed to donate to political parties.

The regulator is Australia’s Charitable and Nonprofit Commission (ACNC), and its website seems to make it clear that making political contributions is a disqualification for charities.

Nevertheless, Michael West Media We have confirmed the number of donations to the Liberal Party in the last three years. In disclosure to the NSW Election Commission:

  • The Armenian Relief Society paid $ 2970 to have breakfast with Prime Minister Gladys Beregikrian last March.
  • Cerebral Palsy Foundation paid $ 1790 for premiere and dinner in May 2018
  • The Sydney Children Hospital Foundation paid $ 1,900 for a conversation with the premiere.

ACNC was contacted for comment, but refused to provide answers to the recorded questions. The request for an interview with Commissioner Gary Jones has not yet been answered.

Charities typically raise money from both community donors, corporate donors, and government donations. In the case of the Cerebral Palsy Foundation, more than half of its income comes from government subsidies. Oddly enough, the Foundation donates a little money to the Liberal Party, and the Government Liberal Party gives the Foundation quite a lot of money.

To emphasize the scandal here: Charities are giving money to parties from community donors to use in campaigns to maintain power, and the parties that control the government are taxpayers, not Liberal money. Charity with money.

According to ACNC guidance:

Do charities need to support (or oppose) a particular political party or candidate?

No, because charities are at risk of turning out to have ineligible political purposes and are therefore not registered charities.

Do charities need to donate money to specific candidates or political parties during the campaign?

No, because charities run the risk of finding out that they have the purpose of supporting a particular candidate or political party.

Do charities need to attend political party-sponsored events?

Charitable representatives should consider carefully before deciding to attend an event hosted by a political party.

Do charities need to attend a political party or candidate fundraising event?

Is the event a political party or candidate fundraising activity? In that case, there is a risk that the charity will prove to have the purpose of promoting a political party or candidate.

Is the attendance fee priced to include surplus for political funding purposes? In that case, there is a risk that the charity will prove to have the purpose of promoting a political party or candidate.

If these issues are not clear, the charity should inquire about the nature of the event.

All charities mentioned in this story were contacted for comment. There is still nothing available to discuss this issue.

This article first appeared in Michael West Media Reproduced with permission.

Place of originCharities pay for liberal fundraising, despite no-hitter for regulatory donations

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