Australia

Domestic violence survivors were urged to speak out as a helpline for women from the Indian subcontinent was launched.

“I miss my sister. I miss her every second.”

Those were the words of Jaspreto Singh on Sunday. His sister, Kamaljeet Sidhu, was allegedly killed by her husband in western Sydney in May.

Singh told SBS News at an event to launch a new 24/7 helpline for the Harman Foundation for women experiencing domestic and domestic violence. The Foundation primarily supports women in the Indian subcontinent of Australia.

27-year-old Sidhu moved from India to Australia with her husband two years ago and obtained a student visa.

“My sister has died and will never come back. This is a lesson for other women and you should speak up if you have a problem with your house,” Shin said.

Kamaljeet Sidhu died in May.

Supply

Defenders of domestic and domestic violence survivors have long expressed concern that temporary visa holders are particularly vulnerable because they do not have access to key health and social services such as Medicare and Centrelink. It was.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, temporary visa holders also had no access to the government’s JobKeeper and JobSeeker financial support programs.

Shin hopes to be able to implement more protection.

“For international students facing the problem of domestic violence, they have little place to rely on, so I think the government should put in place policies for them,” he said.

“We need to be more aware of the women’s rights of international students so that they can learn what they are.”

Harinder Kaur is a co-founder of the Harman Foundation.

Harinder Kaur is a co-founder of the Harman Foundation.

SBS News

A spokesman for the Social Welfare Department said in a parliamentary survey last month that calls to Australia’s domestic violence helpline 1800 RESPECT have risen since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Harinder Kaur, co-founder of the Harman Foundation, said demand for the service increased five to six times a week.

“Since March, requests for help have gone from 10 times a week to 50 or 60 times a week,” she said.

“We have a hotline and we hope we can better serve our victims. We needed to increase the number of volunteers so that some people could answer the phone at any time.”

The new helpline (1800 11 66 75) is free and has trained case managers and professional counselors.

Volunteer Simi Bajaj said, “We hope that through an event like today, we can prevent an event like Kamaljeet from happening again.”

The Harman Foundation also offers a variety of grassroots services, including food relief, counseling support, and referrals to other services, including legal assistance.

The Harman Foundation helpline can be accessed at 1800 11 66 75 and for more information, see harmanfoundation.org.au.

If you or anyone you know is affected by family or domestic violence, call 1800RESPECT at 1800 737 732 or visit 1800RESPECT.org.au. In case of emergency, call 000.

Domestic violence survivors were urged to speak out as a helpline for women from the Indian subcontinent was launched.

Source link Domestic violence survivors were urged to speak out as a helpline for women from the Indian subcontinent was launched.

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