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Nikon has given the full-frame Z6 and Z7 mirrorless cams a much needed refreshment

Nikon’s first full-frame mirrorless cameras, the Z6 and Z7, were more than a worthy entry into the market. The Z6 even ran some of Sony’s cameras for their money when it came to video. Two years after its launch, Nikon needs to upgrade its top two mirrorless interchangeable-lens cameras with the Z6II and Z7II.

The body is about the same, but the Z6II and Z7II have some important things like faster continuous shooting speed, improved autofocus, double size shot buffer, and support for recording 4K video at 60 FPS. It has been upgraded by specification.

The main driving force behind the Z6 II and Z7 II upgrades is that they include dual Expeed 6 image processors instead of one as in previous models. This improves the performance of both cameras and increases the overhead of handling demanding tasks.

Photo: Nikon, etc.

Click for the official image of the Nikon Z6 II.

On the Z6II, this means that the maximum continuous shooting speed is from 5.5 shots per second for 12-bit RAW with single-point continuous AF to up to 14 shots per second, or up to 12 per second if subject tracking is turned on. It means that you jumped into the shot. .. For the Z7II, the jumps aren’t that big, but the continuous shooting speed has gone from 9 fps on the Z7 to 10 fps with everything enabled.

Also, thanks to the dual Expeed 6 ISP, Nikon has both faster and more sensitive autofocus (up to -4.5 EV) on both the Z6 II and Z7 II, when using wide AF settings instead of being restricted. It says it supports both face and eye detection, as before, with full auto area AF only. This allows you to fine-tune the specific areas that the Z6II and Z7II track, without the possibility of confusing the camera with multiple potential subjects throughout the frame.

Photo: Nikon, etc.

Photo: Nikon, etc.

Click for the official image of the Nikon Z7II.

Click for the official image of the Nikon Z7II.

For video, the Z6II and Z7II can now perform 4K / 60fps video recording with 10-bit N-Log (or HLG if you are using external recording). However, both cameras use different levels of crop for 4K / 60fps video, the Z6II crops down to APS-C size, and the Z7II uses 1.08x crop.

In terms of battery life, Nikon’s new energy-saving photo mode has increased the number of shots on the Z7II to 380 shots on a single charge. If that’s not enough, you can charge and use the Z6II and Z7II at the same time through the camera’s USB-C port, and add more juice with Nikon’s new MB-N11 battery grip.

Nikon’s new MB-N11 battery grip starts at around $ 400 ($ 558). (Photo: Nikon)

Other elements like the Z6II and Z7II modes and dials remain pretty much the same. Unfortunately, this means that the Z6II and Z7II’s rear touch screens only tilt, not completely flip, as the number of mirrorless cams increases. However, Nikon in particular added a second UHS II SD card slot to complement the existing XQD slot. This needs to address concerns from people who are worried that data may be lost.

The Z6II will arrive at the beginning of November for $ 2,000 ($ 2,790) (body only) or $ US2,600 ($ 3,627) with a 24-70mm Nikkor Z lens. The Z7II will continue in late December starting at $ 3,000 ($ 4,185) (body only) or $ US3,600 ($ 5,022) with the same 24-70mm lens.

Nikon has given the full-frame Z6 and Z7 mirrorless cams a much needed refreshment

Source link Nikon has given the full-frame Z6 and Z7 mirrorless cams a much needed refreshment

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